09 August 2016

Hidden Oaks and Not-So-Hidden Traffic in Carbon Canyon

While heading eastbound on Carbon Canyon Road this morning at a little before 8, it was observed that one of the owners of the Hidden Oaks property, proposed for 107 houses south of the state highway and directly across from the in-progres 76 unit Hillcrest project (yes, that's 183 more houses for a population of almost 800 people that will access Carbon Canyon Road from one intersection) was out at the entrance talking to someone . . . and smiling.

More than likely, the property owner wasn't smiling at the westbound commuter traffic that wound its way, as this blogger continued east, all the way back to Chino Hills Parkway, with a few small breaks in between the continuous line.

More than likely, the property owner, who told this blogger at a community meeting that he and his fellow investors all planned to live in their development and who would, if this were true (a cynic might suggest it was a line to placate opponents of the project) have to deal first-hand with the mounting volume of traffic, was smiling at the thought of the profits he envisions if he can get approval for the project and then sell the property for the expected increase in value that would accrue.

More than likely, the property owner will not be around if the project was built (again, this is a cynic's conjecture) and the traffic continued to get worse, on top of the fire risk for a project largely built on ridge tops where wind gusts are stronger, on top of the uncertainty of future water supply for what will be the same general type of "luxury" embodied in "estate homes" on large lots.

More than likely, if the property owner realizes his ambitions and makes his money from speculation (says the said cynic) and goes smiling all the way to the bank (or wherever the dollars flow), those of us still living in Carbon Canyon and dealing with the consequences won't be smiling.

2 comments:

Amber said...

Hi! I just found your blog and I wanted to say thank you for collecting Carbon Canyon's local history. I grew up in Chino Hills and now live in Yorba Linda. I'm a student at Cal State Fullerton, but I'm once again working in Chino Hills, so I take Carbon Canyon to work almost daily. I was wondering if you knew of any sort of historical society regarding the Rancho Santa Ana Del Chino area? I've found mention of one in Chino, but there isn't much of an online presence. I'm still reading through your archives, but please let me know if there are any resources (digital or otherwise) you would recommend. I work at the Chino Hills library, and we get questions about local history on occasion, but our resources on the topic are dismal.

prs said...

Hi Amber, there is a historical society in both Chino and Chino Hills, the latter of which has meetings a few times a year at the community center near the library. The next one is one I'm doing on 3 October on where the names Peyton and English come from (appropriate for you because you work at the library at that intersection.) The main contact is Denise Cattern, who works for the city. Contact her at 909.597.6449. As far as local history sources, there isn't much. There's a good amount here. Al McCombs, publisher emeritus of the Chino/Chino Hills Champion, knows more local history than anyone else and often writes about it in that paper. Hope this helps.